The True Mind Zendo

About

Our Sangha is focused on teaching and practicing the skill of True Mind, which is enlightenment and it is nothing at all (as thought in the mind).

In general, there are two types of mind,
the mind that is trained to obtain peace from the quieting of thought,
and the mind that is untrained and distracted.

A skillful mind that is able to obtain liberation from suffering is the True Mind.

The Supreme Bodhi is enlightenment, it is everything and nothing, it is not born nor does it die.

You may say, how is it that the Supreme Bodhi can be something and nothing?

The Supreme Bodhi is boundless mind, when mind is: That which continues to have discerning nature, in the absence of discernment as perception follows the change of form to undergo its own change.

The Supreme Bodhi Zendo is about the practice of balanced and boundless mind or True Mind with effort,
which is Samadhi so that the practice can be without effort, which is Sahaja Samadhi:
"Sahaja samadhi is a state in which a silent level within the subject
is maintained along with, (simultaneously with), the full use of the human faculties."
- Samadhi

More clues to help us track what is this illusive "Supreme Bodhi" (supreme state):

"Holding onto the supreme state is Samadhi.
When it is with effort due to mental disturbances, it is Savikalpa.
When these disturbances are absent, it is Nirvikalpa.
Remaining permanently in the primal state without effort is Sahaja."
- Ramana Maharshi

"Kevala nirvikalpa samadhi is temporary,
whereas sahaja nirvikalpa samadhi is a continuous state throughout daily activity.
This state seems inherently more complex than sāmadhi,
since it involves several aspects of life, namely
external activity, internal quietude, and the relation between them.
It also seems to be a more advanced state, since it comes after the mastering of samadhi."
- Samadhi

How is this skillfulness matured?

Through the practice of the meditation of middle path, diminished or quieted thought, or even said to be no-thought:
The practice of balancing thought dynamically; no thought arising and no thought ceasing, in this moment in time.

More about this meditation on our meditation page.

Favorite Sutras/Suttas:

Dvedhavitakka Sutta and The Surangama Sutra.
It is from the Surangama Sutra that we have an understanding
of what is Sahaja Samadhi as perfectly balanced and boundless mind
and have created a way to teach this practice and experience.
Which I will relate on the meditation page.

There are three parts of these Suttas/Sutras,
that we use most of all:

From the Dvedhavitakka Sutta:
"Whatever a monk keeps pursuing with his thinking and pondering,
that becomes the inclination of his awareness.
If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with sensuality,
abandoning thinking imbued with renunciation,
his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with sensuality.
If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with ill will,
abandoning thinking imbued with non-ill will,
his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with ill will.
If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with harmfulness,
abandoning thinking imbued with harmlessness,
his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with harmfulness....
Whatever a monk keeps pursuing with his thinking and pondering,
that becomes the inclination of his awareness.
If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with renunciation,
abandoning thinking imbued with sensuality,
his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with renunciation.
If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with non-ill will,
abandoning thinking imbued with ill will,
his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with non-ill will.
If a monk keeps pursuing thinking imbued with harmlessness,
abandoning thinking imbued with harmfulness,
his mind is bent by that thinking imbued with harmlessness."

From the Surangama Sutra:
"That which continues to possess discerning nature,
even in the absence of sense data is really your mind."

From the Surangama Sutra:
"If perception follows the change of form to undergo its own change,
there would be no boundary."